Malaria Heroes

In many African cultures, religious leaders can be a valuable entry point into communities as well as powerful communicators for health messages.

“Once you reach out to religious leaders, you have reached out to the entire community since every member of a community belongs to a church.” Pastor William Dennis McDonald in Livingstone, Zambia at a meeting to orient religious leaders on malaria mass drug administration.

To learn more, read our entry on Instagram.
In many African cultures, religious leaders can be a valuable entry point into communities as well as powerful communicators for health messages.

“Once you reach out to religious leaders, you have reached out to the entire community since every member of a community belongs to a church.” Pastor William Dennis McDonald in Livingstone, Zambia at a meeting to orient religious leaders on malaria mass drug administration.

To learn more, read our entry on Instagram.

Photo: PATH/Elizabeth Chiyende
“Among the diseases totally eliminated in Sri Lanka, all except malaria were achieved with immunization—‘the magic bullet.’ But there was no magic bullet when we eliminated malaria. It was achieved through good malaria control and public health practice adhering to the basics of good surveillance, rapid diagnosis, quick response to cases, and targeted vector control.”
–Rajitha Wickremasinghe, professor of Public Health at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka.

Born and raised in Sri Lanka, Professor Wickremasinghe had witnessed his country come tantalizingly close to elimination in the early ’60s, only to suffer a devastating resurgence when resources dried up prematurely. Those experiences informed the approach that led to Sri Lanka's recent "malaria-free" certification by the WHO.

In addition to his university post, Professor Wickremasinghe (who has been involved in malaria research for nearly 25 years) sits on a case review committee that regularly convenes to classify all reported malaria cases in Sri Lanka as imported or indigenous. Confirming that indigenous transmission had indeed been interrupted was a necessary step for elimination certification. “It is a privilege and honor to be a part of the whole process. To witness this achievement during my lifetime is indeed a dream come true.”

“Among the diseases totally eliminated in Sri Lanka, all except malaria were achieved with immunization—‘the magic bullet.’ But there was no magic bullet when we eliminated malaria. It was achieved through good malaria control and public health practice adhering to the basics of good surveillance, rapid diagnosis, quick response to cases, and targeted vector control.”
–Rajitha Wickremasinghe, professor of Public Health at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka.

Born and raised in Sri Lanka, Professor Wickremasinghe had witnessed his country come tantalizingly close to elimination in the early ’60s, only to suffer a devastating resurgence when resources dried up prematurely. Those experiences informed the approach that led to Sri Lanka's recent "malaria-free" certification by the WHO.

In addition to his university post, Professor Wickremasinghe (who has been involved in malaria research for nearly 25 years) sits on a case review committee that regularly convenes to classify all reported malaria cases in Sri Lanka as imported or indigenous. Confirming that indigenous transmission had indeed been interrupted was a necessary step for elimination certification. “It is a privilege and honor to be a part of the whole process. To witness this achievement during my lifetime is indeed a dream come true.”

Photo: Charitha Wijesiriwardana.
“Sylvia was an extraordinary leader. She had a rare combination of strategic vision, solid technical expertise, and extensive field experience that was widely recognized by her peers at WHO and across the malaria community,” wrote Dr. Pedro Alonso, director of the World Health Organization’s Global Malaria Programme.

Dr. Sylvia Meek (pictured, left), whose life and career were marked by numerous demonstrations of leadership and compassion, passed away on May 11 after an 18-month bout with cancer.

During a career in malaria, vector control, and child health that spanned over 35 years, Dr. Meek worked for the WHO in the Solomon Islands, Namibia, and Cambodia, and even as career pursuits led her to other organizations—including the World Food Programme, the United Nations Development Programme, a nine-year stint as director of the Department for International Development's resource center, and her final post as technical director of Malaria Consortium—her ties to WHO endured as she served on a number of WHO advisory committees focused on malaria control and elimination throughout her career.

As recently as December 2015, Dr. Meek continued to tackle the intricacies and challenges of eliminating malaria, saying to an audience of parliamentarians, development specialists, international organizations, and diplomats in Brussels, “The shortfall in malaria investment is daunting. It is important we find the right balance between funding countries with the highest burden, and those aspiring for malaria elimination.”

As her Malaria Consortium colleague Dr. Jeffrey Hii said: “Sylvia’s impact on Malaria Consortium and associates was, and continues to be, immense. She was an inspiration and everything we could ever admire in our profession and our personal lives.”
“Sylvia was an extraordinary leader. She had a rare combination of strategic vision, solid technical expertise, and extensive field experience that was widely recognized by her peers at WHO and across the malaria community,” wrote Dr. Pedro Alonso, director of the World Health Organization’s Global Malaria Programme.

Dr. Sylvia Meek (pictured, left), whose life and career were marked by numerous demonstrations of leadership and compassion, passed away on May 11 after an 18-month bout with cancer.

During a career in malaria, vector control, and child health that spanned over 35 years, Dr. Meek worked for the WHO in the Solomon Islands, Namibia, and Cambodia, and even as career pursuits led her to other organizations—including the World Food Programme, the United Nations Development Programme, a nine-year stint as director of the Department for International Development's resource center, and her final post as technical director of Malaria Consortium—her ties to WHO endured as she served on a number of WHO advisory committees focused on malaria control and elimination throughout her career.

As recently as December 2015, Dr. Meek continued to tackle the intricacies and challenges of eliminating malaria, saying to an audience of parliamentarians, development specialists, international organizations, and diplomats in Brussels, “The shortfall in malaria investment is daunting. It is important we find the right balance between funding countries with the highest burden, and those aspiring for malaria elimination.”

As her Malaria Consortium colleague Dr. Jeffrey Hii said: “Sylvia’s impact on Malaria Consortium and associates was, and continues to be, immense. She was an inspiration and everything we could ever admire in our profession and our personal lives.”

Photo: Malaria Consortium
“Don’t believe that elimination is possible? You have two options: one, leave the room; two, sleep during my remarks . . . but please do so under a treated net so mosquitoes don’t bite you.”
–Dr. Joseph Kasonde, Minister of Health, Zambia.

At a recent cross-border elimination meeting in Livingstone hosted by Zambia and attended by Angola, Namibia, and Zimbabwe, Dr. Kasonde called for enhanced ties with neighboring countries to effectively fight malaria. “We intend to eliminate malaria in Zambia and if we are to do that effectively, we must work together with our neighbors so that the borders do not become crossing point for the disease,” Dr. Kasonde said.
“Don’t believe that elimination is possible? You have two options: one, leave the room; two, sleep during my remarks . . . but please do so under a treated net so mosquitoes don’t bite you.”
–Dr. Joseph Kasonde, Minister of Health, Zambia.

At a recent cross-border elimination meeting in Livingstone hosted by Zambia and attended by Angola, Namibia, and Zimbabwe, Dr. Kasonde called for enhanced ties with neighboring countries to effectively fight malaria. “We intend to eliminate malaria in Zambia and if we are to do that effectively, we must work together with our neighbors so that the borders do not become crossing point for the disease,” Dr. Kasonde said.

Photo: U.S. Mission Photo by Eric Bridiers; this photo has been modified.
Every morning, Mumba Kundu sets out in his canoe to fish on Lake Kariba. Some days are brutal. Like most people who live in the Zambian village of Chipepo, he suffers the fever and headaches of malaria multiple times each year. On those days, he has to force himself out on the lake. “If I don’t go,” he says, “it means hunger for my family.”

Thanks to a village distribution program, Mumba and his family now have insecticide-treated mosquito nets. And thanks to the fisherman’s association, which Mumba is part of, villagers are avoiding the temptation of using the bednets for other purposes: the association created a bylaw that imposes a fine on fishermen who use bednets as fishing nets. “Malaria has an immediate impact,” Mumba says. “If people don’t go fishing they don’t have food. If we could end malaria, people would be very active and productive.”

He adds, “I believe we can eliminate malaria.”
Every morning, Mumba Kundu sets out in his canoe to fish on Lake Kariba. Some days are brutal. Like most people who live in the Zambian village of Chipepo, he suffers the fever and headaches of malaria multiple times each year. On those days, he has to force himself out on the lake. “If I don’t go,” he says, “it means hunger for my family.”

Thanks to a village distribution program, Mumba and his family now have insecticide-treated mosquito nets. And thanks to the fisherman’s association, which Mumba is part of, villagers are avoiding the temptation of using the bednets for other purposes: the association created a bylaw that imposes a fine on fishermen who use bednets as fishing nets. “Malaria has an immediate impact,” Mumba says. “If people don’t go fishing they don’t have food. If we could end malaria, people would be very active and productive.”

He adds, “I believe we can eliminate malaria.”
Photo: PATH/Gabe Bienczycki.
“The way that we do research nowadays is a little inefficient because we don’t share enough. . . we should use (the model of open source software) to do science in a brutally open collaboration that could include anybody.”
–Matthew Todd, founder of Open Source Malaria (OSM).

Todd, associate professor at the University of Sydney, has embraced open science as a tool to accelerate research to discover new medicines, including finding cures for malaria. The OSM project uses a wiki to share and discuss promising chemical compounds. Of OSM’s virtues, Dr. Todd said: “We now can work together in real time, which means that we can build on the expertise of anybody. By admitting what you can’t do in public you can attract incredibly well-qualified people to join your research. . . in the process you can encourage participation by very large groups of people. . . these are major changes to the way that we work.”

For this and for sharing the latest innovations in the fight against malaria on his Twitter (through both the Open Source Malaria and his personal handle), Facebook, and Google Plus accounts, Matthew was recently named the winner of the Social Media Awards: Malaria Heroes in the Innovator category. To see a full interview with Matthew, click here.
“The way that we do research nowadays is a little inefficient because we don’t share enough. . . we should use (the model of open source software) to do science in a brutally open collaboration that could include anybody.”
–Matthew Todd, founder of Open Source Malaria (OSM).

Todd, associate professor at the University of Sydney, has embraced open science as a tool to accelerate research to discover new medicines, including finding cures for malaria. The OSM project uses a wiki to share and discuss promising chemical compounds. Of OSM’s virtues, Dr. Todd said: “We now can work together in real time, which means that we can build on the expertise of anybody. By admitting what you can’t do in public you can attract incredibly well-qualified people to join your research. . . in the process you can encourage participation by very large groups of people...these are major changes to the way that we work.”

For this and for sharing the latest innovations in the fight against malaria on his Twitter (through both the Open Source Malaria and his personal handle), Facebook, and Google Plus accounts, Matthew was recently named the winner of the Social Media Awards: Malaria Heroes in the Innovator category. To see a full interview with Matthew, click here.

Photo: The University of Sydney.
“Apart from having the highest burden of malaria, Nigeria also has the largest population of internet and social media users in Africa. Though I work primarily on management of malaria data, I found social media a useful platform to mobilize Nigerians—especially the youth—to help the malaria elimination effort. Using the hashtag #BeatMalaria, I shared malaria prevention information, publications, and news stories on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and my blogs. Many other active social media users have become interested and use the hashtag to share their thoughts on malaria as well.”
–Dr. Lazarus Eze, Senior Monitoring and Evaluation Officer for the Association for Reproductive and Family Health.

Dr. Eze is a public health physician, policy advocate, and consultant on youth development issues leading efforts to strengthen health data management systems in five Nigerian states in support of the Global Fund’s malaria program. His use of the #BeatMalaria hashtag to create awareness and share resources on malaria prevention and management earned him the Social Media Awards: Malaria Heroes in the Young Leader category. To see an interview with Dr. Eze, click here.
“Apart from having the highest burden of malaria, Nigeria also has the largest population of internet and social media users in Africa. Though I work primarily on management of malaria data, I found social media a useful platform to mobilize Nigerians—especially the youth—to help the malaria elimination effort. Using the hashtag #BeatMalaria, I shared malaria prevention information, publications, and news stories on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and my blogs. Many other active social media users have become interested and use the hashtag to share their thoughts on malaria as well.”
–Dr. Lazarus Eze, Senior Monitoring and Evaluation Officer for the Association for Reproductive and Family Health.

Dr. Eze is a public health physician, policy advocate, and consultant on youth development issues leading efforts to strengthen health data management systems in five Nigerian states in support of the Global Fund’s malaria program. His use of the #BeatMalaria hashtag to create awareness and share resources on malaria prevention and management earned him the Social Media Awards: Malaria Heroes in the Young Leader category. To see an interview with Dr. Eze, click here.

Photo: @talkvillageint
“A survey that we did just a few years ago showed that only 2 percent of the scientific community in Africa are able to access scientific information without trouble. I find it a huge disgrace that those that are working in the center of Congo that need the latest information on how to treat a child that is desperately ill with malaria don’t have the latest information on how best to cure that child because that information is either inaccessible or it is behind a pay wall. And that got Inga—my wife—and myself so upset that we said, ‘We’re gonna do something about this, we’re gonna try and get as much scientific information out there in the public domain so that anyone around the world can access it.’ Because that’s ethical, that’s what we are supposed to be doing. And that’s how MalariaWorld started.”
–Bart Knols, founder of MalariaWorld.org, Chief Innovation Officer at In2Care BV.

Based in the Netherlands and Kenya, MalariaWorld is the largest scientific and social network for malaria professionals, with over 8,700 subscribers. The network disseminates its content through Twitter (@KnolsMosquito and @MalariaWorld), and Facebook. Because of his invaluable communications work, Knols was recognized in the People’s Choice for Best Communications category of the Malaria Heroes Social Media Awards. To see an interview with Knols, click here.
“A survey that we did just a few years ago showed that only 2 percent of the scientific community in Africa are able to access scientific information without trouble. I find it a huge disgrace that those that are working in the center of Congo that need the latest information on how to treat a child that is desperately ill with malaria don’t have the latest information on how best to cure that child because that information is either inaccessible or it is behind a pay wall. And that got Inga—my wife—and myself so upset that we said, ‘We’re gonna do something about this, we’re gonna try and get as much scientific information out there in the public domain so that anyone around the world can access it.’ Because that’s ethical, that’s what we are supposed to be doing. And that’s how MalariaWorld started.”
–Bart Knols, founder of MalariaWorld.org, Chief Innovation Officer at In2Care BV.

Based in the Netherlands and Kenya, MalariaWorld is the largest scientific and social network for malaria professionals, with over 8,700 subscribers. The network disseminates its content through Twitter (@KnolsMosquito and @MalariaWorld), and Facebook. Because of his invaluable communications work, Knols was recognized in the People’s Choice for Best Communications category of the Malaria Heroes Social Media Awards. To see an interview with Knols, click here.
“(Social media) is really important for Rwanda—which has been known as a country where we only had genocides—for documenting what we are doing, not only regarding social and economic development but also in the health sector. . . . Since we are doing very good work in malaria control it’s really very important that we change the image of Rwanda so people know what we are doing in terms of malaria control.”
–Dr. Corine Karema, head of the National Malaria Control Program in Rwanda.

At the forefront of research, advocacy, and community outreach to fight malaria nationally and throughout the region, Dr. Karema shares the lessons and victories from Rwanda around the world through her social media presence. For this, she was recently named winner of the Social Media Awards: Malaria Heroes, in the Regional Malaria Champion: Africa category. To see a full interview with Dr. Karema, click here.
“(Social media) is really important for Rwanda—which has been known as a country where we only had genocides—for documenting what we are doing, not only regarding social and economic development but also in the health sector. . . . Since we are doing very good work in malaria control it’s really very important that we change the image of Rwanda so people know what we are doing in terms of malaria control.”
–Dr. Corine Karema, head of the National Malaria Control Program in Rwanda.

At the forefront of research, advocacy, and community outreach to fight malaria nationally and throughout the region, Dr. Karema shares the lessons and victories from Rwanda around the world through her social media presence. For this, she was recently named winner of the Social Media Awards: Malaria Heroes, in the Regional Malaria Champion: Africa category. To see a full interview with Dr. Karema, click here.
Early in her career, upon witnessing the heavy mortal toll malaria exacted on Southeast Asia, Dr. Sara Canavati resolved to fight the disease.

“To me there was no reason that people should die from that disease. There was treatment, there were prevention measures, and I just could not accept the fact that we were seeing so many deaths at that time. Especially when I was working in Myanmar, many people died in front of me and I just could not accept it.”

Now a research scientist at the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit in Cambodia, Dr. Canavati’s primary focus is on one of the greatest threats in global health today: artemisinin- and multidrug-resistant malaria. In addition, for her passionate online advocacy for malaria elimination through the World Federation of Parasitologists Facebook page as well as her own Facebook and Twitter accounts, Dr. Canavati was recently named the winner of the Social Media Awards: Malaria Heroes in the Regional Malaria Champion: Asia-Pacific category. To see a full interview with Dr. Canavati, click here.
Early in her career, upon witnessing the heavy mortal toll malaria exacted on Southeast Asia, Dr. Sara Canavati resolved to fight the disease.

“To me there was no reason that people should die from that disease. There was treatment, there were prevention measures, and I just could not accept the fact that we were seeing so many deaths at that time. Especially when I was working in Myanmar, many people died in front of me and I just could not accept it.”

Now a research scientist at the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit in Cambodia, Dr. Canavati’s primary focus is on one of the greatest threats in global health today: artemisinin- and multidrug-resistant malaria. In addition, for her passionate online advocacy for malaria elimination through the World Federation of Parasitologists Facebook page as well as her own Facebook and Twitter accounts, Dr. Canavati was recently named the winner of the Social Media Awards: Malaria Heroes in the Regional Malaria Champion: Asia-Pacific category. To see a full interview with Dr. Canavati, click here.

Photo: Sara Canavati
“We can have a Zambia in which kids grow up and never experience malaria (and) don’t even know what it was. And I think that’s an ambitious goal worth striving for.”
–Dr. Alan Magill.

Following a decorated career in public health, Dr. Magill passed away on September 19 in Seattle. He most recently served as director of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Malaria Program.

The quotation above came from a World Malaria Day commemoration in Zambia last April, where Dr. Magill spoke about the country’s prospects for malaria elimination. “It is absolutely achievable,” he said. “It starts at the individual level and at the family level and at the community level when communities realize that they don’t have to live with malaria. . . They can take the steps, with help from others, to take malaria out of their village forever and then build from that country-wide. I think that’s the exciting thing and I think Zambia can do it.”

To read remembrances of Dr. Magill, click here.
“We can have a Zambia in which kids grow up and never experience malaria (and) don’t even know what it was. And I think that’s an ambitious goal worth striving for.”
–Dr. Alan Magill.

Following a decorated career in public health, Dr. Magill passed away on September 19 in Seattle. He most recently served as director of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Malaria Program.

The quotation above came from a World Malaria Day commemoration in Zambia last April, where Dr. Magill spoke about the country’s prospects for malaria elimination. “It is absolutely achievable,” he said. “It starts at the individual level and at the family level and at the community level when communities realize that they don’t have to live with malaria... They can take the steps, with help from others, to take malaria out of their village forever and then build from that country-wide. I think that’s the exciting thing and I think Zambia can do it.”

To read remembrances of Dr. Magill, click here.

Photo: PATH/Todd Jennings.
“When I was younger I suffered from severe malaria because I was not sleeping under a net. From that time onward, I decided that I needed to help teach people how to prevent malaria and also be a role model in the community by sleeping under a net myself. This was why I was so upset when my daughter stayed at a friend’s home for two days, not sleeping under a net, and returned with malaria. Malaria is preventable and people need to know that."
–Rodgers Nyirenda, SKILLZ malaria instructor, Bondo Village, Mulanje, Malawi.

SKILLZ is part of Grassroot Soccer, which strives to educate children in southern Africa on health issues through soccer and other activities. Primarily an HIV prevention program, in Malawi the SKILLZ curriculum includes a malaria prevention component of which Rodgers—an avid soccer player and fan—is an instructor, stressing the importance of healthy living, particularly when it comes to properly hanging bednets and sleeping under them.
“When I was younger I suffered from severe malaria because I was not sleeping under a net. From that time onward, I decided that I needed to help teach people how to prevent malaria and also be a role model in the community by sleeping under a net myself. This was why I was so upset when my daughter stayed at a friend’s home for two days, not sleeping under a net, and returned with malaria. Malaria is preventable and people need to know that."
–Rodgers Nyirenda, SKILLZ malaria instructor, Bondo Village, Mulanje, Malawi.

SKILLZ is part of Grassroot Soccer, which strives to educate children in southern Africa on health issues through soccer and other activities. Primarily an HIV prevention program, in Malawi the SKILLZ curriculum includes a malaria prevention component of which Rodgers—an avid soccer player and fan—is an instructor, stressing the importance of healthy living, particularly when it comes to properly hanging bednets and sleeping under them.
Photo: Emma Bussard.
Jimmy Hachinyama (pictured) is an indoor residual spraying (IRS) operator in Kafue District, Zambia. In addition to spraying households with an insecticide that kills mosquitoes and interrupts the malaria transmission cycle, Jimmy is relied upon to communicate the benefits of IRS to those who initially resist the process.

“Jimmy is exceptionally hardworking and possesses very good interpersonal communication skills such that in instances where we encounter resistance from some households, we send him to speak to the household owners who quickly buy in to the idea of having their houses sprayed,” said Teddy Mofya, the Ministry of Health's malaria focal point person for Kafue District.

To learn more about Jimmy, read Akros' Spraying Malaria Away, and to learn more about Akros' IRS work, go to their website.
Jimmy Hachinyama (pictured) is an indoor residual spraying (IRS) operator in Kafue District, Zambia. In addition to spraying households with an insecticide that kills mosquitoes and interrupts the malaria transmission cycle, Jimmy is relied upon to communicate the benefits of IRS to those who initially resist the process.

“Jimmy is exceptionally hardworking and possesses very good interpersonal communication skills such that in instances where we encounter resistance from some households, we send him to speak to the household owners who quickly buy in to the idea of having their houses sprayed,” said Teddy Mofya, the Ministry of Health's malaria focal point person for Kafue District.

To learn more about Jimmy, read Akros' Spraying Malaria Away, and to learn more about Akros' IRS work, go to their website.
Photo: Andy Prinsen/Akros.
“To end malaria in Shakani village, I want to see citizens fully educated, empowered, and mobilized to combat it. I would like to advance at my work, and become a leader in educating people on how to protect themselves from disease.”
–Habiba Suleiman Sefu, malaria surveillance officer for the USAID-supported Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Program, Shakani village, southwest Zanzibar.

Armed with a mobile phone, tablet, diagnostic tests, and malaria medication, this mother of three travels household to household on her motorbike, testing, treating, and educating household members at risk of malaria while recording information on a surveillance system. Seeing a woman on a motorbike is a rare sight in Zanzibar, but Habiba is not your typical person—she is Zanzibar’s Malaria Hunter. To learn more, read this USAID story.
“To end malaria in Shakani village, I want to see citizens fully educated, empowered, and mobilized to combat it. I would like to advance at my work, and become a leader in educating people on how to protect themselves from disease.”
–Habiba Suleiman Sefu, malaria surveillance officer for the USAID-supported Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Program, Shakani village, southwest Zanzibar.

Armed with a mobile phone, tablet, diagnostic tests, and malaria medication, this mother of three travels household to household on her motorbike, testing, treating, and educating household members at risk of malaria while recording information on a surveillance system. Seeing a woman on a motorbike is a rare sight in Zanzibar, but Habiba is not your typical person—she is Zanzibar’s Malaria Hunter. To learn more, read this USAID story.
Photo: USAID/Morgana Wingard.
"When we arrive in a village people recognize us. They’ll say 'Hi, mosquito catchers!' and the children will run and tell their parents that the guys who catch mosquitoes are here. So it’s great to see that the work is slowly being recognized, and being accepted. For me, it’s heartwarming."
–Kochelani Saili (middle), a PATH entomological surveillance officer in Zambia.

Kochelani and his colleagues monitor the behavior, population dynamics, and resistance to insecticides of mosquitoes—work that has earned them nicknames like the “mosquito catchers” and “mosquito whisperers.” (To learn more about their work, read A night in the field with the "mosquito whisperers").
"When we arrive in a village people recognize us. They’ll say 'Hi, mosquito catchers!' and the children will run and tell their parents that the guys who catch mosquitoes are here. So it’s great to see that the work is slowly being recognized, and being accepted. For me, it’s heartwarming."
–Kochelani Saili (middle, with Patson Singombe and Hillary Syatupale), a PATH entomological surveillance officer in Zambia.

Kochelani and his colleagues monitor the behavior, population dynamics, and resistance to insecticides of mosquitoes—work that has earned them nicknames like the “mosquito catchers” and “mosquito whisperers.” (To learn more about their work, read A night in the field with the "mosquito whisperers").
Photo: Kochelani Saili, PATH.
"Like most people in Africa, I've suffered from malaria—but I was able to get proper care and survive. This was not the case for my cousin, Ami Diop, who died of malaria when she was 12 years old. Her mother was not able to get her to treatment in time. She died within a week of showing a fever. Now, I am working to personally ensure that people have access to life-saving information about malaria prevention and treatment, and that additional resources are mobilized for malaria elimination. I am doing this to ensure that the global community is bringing the fight against malaria to every single person in the most remote communities in Senegal."
–Yacine Djibo, president and founder of Speak Up Africa and chairman of Senegal's framework for partner cooperation on malaria control.
"Like most people in Africa, I've suffered from malaria—but I was able to get proper care and survive. This was not the case for my cousin, Ami Diop, who died of malaria when she was 12 years old. Her mother was not able to get her to treatment in time. She died within a week of showing a fever. Now, I am working to personally ensure that people have access to life-saving information about malaria prevention and treatment, and that additional resources are mobilized for malaria elimination. I am doing this to ensure that the global community is bringing the fight against malaria to every single person in the most remote communities in Senegal."
–Yacine Djibo, president and founder of Speak Up Africa and chairman of Senegal's framework for partner cooperation on malaria control (Cadre de concertation des partenaires pour la lutte contre le paludisme, or CCPLP).
Photo: Speak Up Africa.
James P. Zumwalt (right), US ambassador to the Republic of Senegal, committed to the "Zero Malaria! Count Me In!" campaign by signing the declaration and committing to work with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) and its partners to eliminate malaria from Senegal. The Declaration was signed alongside Dr. Mady Ba, Senegal NMCP coordinator.
James P. Zumwalt (right), US ambassador to the Republic of Senegal, committed to the "Zero Malaria! Count Me In!" campaign by signing the declaration and committing to work with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) and its partners to eliminate malaria from Senegal. The Declaration was signed alongside Dr. Mady Ba, Senegal NMCP coordinator.
Photo: Speak Up Africa.
“Seeing your child, who was previously active and playing, now unable to move . . . you stop looking at malaria as a researcher. You look at it now as a mom.”
–Dr. Nekoye Otsyula, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative.
(Read “A doctor resolves to end malaria” from the PATH blog)
“Seeing your child, who was previously active and playing, now unable to move . . . you stop looking at malaria as a researcher. You look at it now as a mom.”
–Dr. Nekoye Otsyula, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative. (Read “A doctor resolves to end malaria” from the PATH blog).
Photo: PATH/Eric Becker.