Primaquine to reduce transmission of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Mali: a single-blind, dose-ranging, adaptive randomised phase 2 trial

Single low doses of primaquine, when added to artemisinin-based combination therapy, might prevent transmission of Plasmodium falciparum malaria to mosquitoes. A single dose of 0·25 mg/kg primaquine, given alongside dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine, was safe and efficacious for the prevention of P falciparum malaria transmission in boys and men who are not deficient in G6PD

Author: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: June 2016
Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases

An assessment of the supply, programmatic use, and regulatory issues of single low-dose primaquine as a Plasmodium falciparum gametocytocide for sub-Saharan Africa.

This article outlines some of the barriers to single low-dose (SLD) primaquine use to stop P. falciparum transmission. In-country key informants revealed that the WHO weight-based recommendation to use SLD primaquine is challenging to implement in actual field settings, due in part to safety concerns involving G6PD deficiency and drug-drug interactions, among other factors.

Author: , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: May 2015
Source: Malaria Journal

Review of Mass Drug Administration for Malaria and Its Operational Challenges

Despite some substantial knowledge gaps, MDA has been used successfully to control and eliminate Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria in the past, and should be considered as part of a comprehensive malaria elimination strategy in aspecific settings.

Author: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: May 2015
Source: AJTMH

Improving uptake and use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests in the context of artemisinin drug resistance containment in eastern Myanmar: an evaluation of incentive schemes among informal private healthcare providers

As efforts to contain artemisinin resistance and eliminate Plasmodium falciparum intensify, the accurate diagnosis and prompt effective treatment of malaria are increasingly needed in Myanmar and the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS). This study tested different incentives to increase RDT use and improve the quality of care among informal private healthcare providers in Myanmar.

Author: , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: March 2015
Source: Malaria Journal