The effect of malaria control on Plasmodium falciparum in Africa between 2000 and 2015

Although still below target levels, current malaria interventions have substantially reduced malaria disease incidence across the continent. Increasing access to these interventions, and maintaining their effectiveness in the face of insecticide and drug resistance, should form a cornerstone of post-2015 control strategies.

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Publication date: September 2015
Source: Nature

Integrating vector control across diseases

Malaria, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, and dengue are prime candidates for combined vector control. All four of these diseases overlap considerably in their distributions and there is a growing body of evidence for the effectiveness of insecticide-treated nets, screens, and curtains for controlling all of their vectors. The real-world effectiveness of cross-disease vector control programmes can only be evaluated by large-scale trials, but there is clear evidence of the potential of such an approach to enable greater overall health benefit using the limited funds available.

Author: , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: March 2015
Source: BMC Medicine

The effect of malaria control on Plasmodium falciparum in Africa between 2000 and 2015

This article, published in Nature found that Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence in endemic Africa halved and the incidence of clinical disease fell by 40% between 2000 and 2015. Interventions have averted an estimated 663 (542–753 credible interval) million clinical cases since 2000. Insecticide-treated nets, the most widespread intervention, were by far the largest contributor (68% of cases averted).

Author: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: September 2015
Source: Nature