Characterizing and quantifying human movement patterns using GPS data loggers in an area approaching malaria elimination in rural southern Zambia

In areas approaching malaria elimination, human mobility patterns are important in determining the proportion of malaria cases that are imported or the result of low-level, endemic transmission. A convenience sample of participants enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study in the catchment area of Macha Hospital in Choma District, Southern Province, Zambia, was selected to carry a GPS data logger for one month from October 2013 to August 2014. Density maps and activity space plots were created to evaluate seasonal movement patterns. Time spent outside the household compound during anopheline biting times, and time spent in malaria high- and low-risk areas, were calculated.

Author: , , , , , , ,
Publication date: May 2017
Source: The Royal Society

Role of mass drug administration in elimination of Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a consensus modelling study

This study used consensus modeling to understand how to optimize the effects of mass drug administration in areas with low malaria transmission.

Author: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: May 2017
Source: The Lancet Global Health

The geography of imported malaria to non-endemic countries: a meta-analysis of nationally reported statistics

This analysis of existing data and literature on imported malaria cases points to historical and geographical patterns between non-endemic countries and malarious neighboring nations. Such patterns will prove significant in strategizing for malaria elimination and eradication.

Author: , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: January 2017
Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases

Identifying Malaria Transmission Foci for Elimination Using Human Mobility Data

By linking transmission to parasite flow [via human mobility], it is possible to stratify landscapes for malaria control and elimination as [malaria parasite] sources are disproportionately important to the regional persistence of malaria parasites. [This study] examined how the landscape of transmission and burden changed from the pre-elimination setting by comparing the location and extent of predicted pre-elimination transmission foci with modeled incidence for 2009.

Author: , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: April 2016
Source: PLOS Computational Biology

Exploring the spatiotemporal drivers of malaria elimination in Europe

Indicators relating to socio-economic improvements were strongly correlated with the decline of malaria in Europe, whereas those describing climatic and land use changes showed weaker relationships. Present-day malaria-elimination countries have now arrived at similar socio-economic indicator levels as European countries at the time malaria elimination was achieved, offering hope for achievement of sustainable elimination.

Author: , ,
Publication date: March 2016
Source: Malaria Journal

Integrating vector control across diseases

Malaria, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, and dengue are prime candidates for combined vector control. All four of these diseases overlap considerably in their distributions and there is a growing body of evidence for the effectiveness of insecticide-treated nets, screens, and curtains for controlling all of their vectors. The real-world effectiveness of cross-disease vector control programmes can only be evaluated by large-scale trials, but there is clear evidence of the potential of such an approach to enable greater overall health benefit using the limited funds available.

Author: , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: March 2015
Source: BMC Medicine

Distribution of malaria exposure in endemic countries in Africa considering country levels of effective treatment

When coverage of effective treatment is taken into account, higher country level estimates of average EIR and thus higher disease burden, are obtained for a given prevalence level, especially where access to treatment is high, and prevalence relatively low. These methods provide a unified framework for comparison of both the immediate and longer-term impacts of case management and of preventive interventions.

Author: , , , , , , ,
Publication date: April 2015

The effect of malaria control on Plasmodium falciparum in Africa between 2000 and 2015

This article, published in Nature found that Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence in endemic Africa halved and the incidence of clinical disease fell by 40% between 2000 and 2015. Interventions have averted an estimated 663 (542–753 credible interval) million clinical cases since 2000. Insecticide-treated nets, the most widespread intervention, were by far the largest contributor (68% of cases averted).

Author: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: September 2015
Source: Nature

Quantifying cross-border movements and migrations for guiding the strategic planning of malaria control and elimination

National census data for Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda were analysed to highlight patterns in cross-border migration by mapping significant origin-specific immigrant ‘hotspots’ and sub-national areas that should consider collaborating on control and elimination strategies with neighbouring countries. The outcomes of this study will feed into wider efforts to quantify and model human and malaria movements in endemic regions to facilitate improved intervention planning, resource allocation and collaborative policy decisions.

Author: , , , , ,
Publication date: May 2014
Source: Malaria Journal