Social inequalities in malaria knowledge, prevention and prevalence among children under 5 years old and women aged 15–49 in Madagascar

Malaria may be subject to socio-economic forces arising from a broad set of behavioural and geographic determinants, even after adjusting for geographic risk factors and seasonality. Nearly 21 % of the sample lacked primary schooling. To improve malaria reduction efforts, broad-based interventions may need to attack inequalities to ensure that knowledge, prevention and treatment are improved among those who are most vulnerable.

Author: , ,
Publication date: December 2015
Source: Malaria Journal

The effect of malaria control on Plasmodium falciparum in Africa between 2000 and 2015

This article, published in Nature found that Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence in endemic Africa halved and the incidence of clinical disease fell by 40% between 2000 and 2015. Interventions have averted an estimated 663 (542–753 credible interval) million clinical cases since 2000. Insecticide-treated nets, the most widespread intervention, were by far the largest contributor (68% of cases averted).

Author: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: September 2015
Source: Nature

Assessing the effectiveness of household-level focal mass drug administration and community-wide mass drug administration for reducing malaria parasite infection prevalence and incidence in Southern Province, Zambia: study protocol for a community randomized controlled trial

The primary aim of this study is to quantify the relative effectiveness of MDA and fMDA with DHAp against no mass treatment (standard of care) for reducing Plasmodium falciparum prevalence and incidence. Strengths of this trial include: a robust study design (CRCT); cross-sectional parasite surveys as well as a longitudinal cohort; and stratification of high and low transmission areas. Primary limitations include: statistical power to detect only a 50 % reduction in primary outcomes within high and low transmission strata; potential for contamination; and potential for misclassification of exposure.

Author: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: August 2015
Source: Trials Journal

A methodological framework for the improved use of routine health system data to evaluate national malaria control programs: evidence from Zambia

When improved through comprehensive parasitologically confirmed case reporting, HMIS data can become a valuable tool for evaluating malaria program scale-up. Using this approach, this article provides further evidence that increased ITN coverage is associated with decreased malaria morbidity and use of health services for malaria illness in Zambia.

Author: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Publication date: November 2014
Source: Population health metrics

Comparison of a mobile phone-based malaria reporting system with source participant register data for capturing spatial and temporal trends in epidemiological indicators of malaria transmission collected by community health workers in rural Zambia

The SMS reports captured malaria transmission trends with adequate accuracy and could be used for population-wide, continuous, longitudinal monitoring of malaria transmission.

Author: , , , ,
Publication date: December 2014
Source: Malaria Journal

Reductions in Artemisinin-Based Combination Therapy Consumption after the Nationwide Scale up of Routine Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Testing in Zambia

A report on rapid diagnostic test use, drug consumption, and diagnostic results from data collected in three Zambian health districts to determine the impact RDTs had on malaria case management over the period 2004–2009.

Author: , ,
Publication date: July 2012
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene