USAID Course: How To Use Mobile Data Solutions for Better Development Outcomes

Mobile technologies offer transparent, timely and affordable solutions for collecting and disseminating data about people, projects, and programs.

USAID and its implementing partners can utilize this powerful technology to improve the efficiency and quality of the data we use to make decisions and to better meet USAID goals related to the Forward Reforms, the Evaluation Policy, and the Open Data Initiative

This two hour interactive self-paced online course developed by the Global Development Lab at USAID, FHI360, and TechChange will help build the technical capacity necessary to achieve these goals.

Author: , ,
Publication date: 2015

Source: TechChange
Permalink: http://www.makingmalariahistory.org/toolkit-resource/usaid-course-how-to-use-mobile-data-solutions-for-better-development-outcomes/

Comparison of a mobile phone-based malaria reporting system with source participant register data for capturing spatial and temporal trends in epidemiological indicators of malaria transmission collected by community health workers in rural Zambia

Timeliness, completeness, and accuracy are key requirements for any surveillance system to reliably monitor disease burden and guide efficient resource prioritization. Evidence that electronic reporting of malaria cases by CHWs meet these requirements remains limited. This study describes and evaluates a prototype mobile phone reporting platform for a CBSS in rural Zambia that was initially established as a programme implemented by CHWs for community-wide passive and active testing with RDTs and treatment of all confirmed cases with AL, which also allowed monitoring of malaria parasite infection burden as a secondary objective

Author: , , , ,
Publication date: December 2014
Source: Malaria Journal
Permalink: http://www.makingmalariahistory.org/toolkit-resource/comparison-of-a-mobile-phone-based-malaria-reporting-system-with-source-participant-register-data-for-capturing-spatial-and-temporal-trends-in-epidemiological-indicators-of-malaria-transmission-coll-2/